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Paul McCartney Plays The Cavern Club

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Paul McCartney Plays The Cavern Club

Paul McCartney Plays The Cavern Club

Paul McCartney Plays The Cavern Club

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1068049/97113933" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

John Lennon performs at the Cavern Club in Liverpool in December 1961 Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

John Lennon performs at the Cavern Club in Liverpool in December 1961

Evening Standard/Getty Images

Former Beatle Paul McCartney revisits the Cavern Club in Liverpool, England, on December 14, 1999. Dave Hogan/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Hogan/Getty Images

Former Beatle Paul McCartney revisits the Cavern Club in Liverpool, England, on December 14, 1999.

Dave Hogan/Getty Images

There's a bar in Liverpool called the Cavern Club. It's been rebuilt from the time in 1961 when an aspiring band calling themselves The Beatles used to play beneath its brick catacombs.

This week, three hundred highly blessed people squeezed into the Cavern for a performance by Paul McCartney.

Frankie Conner, a presenter on Britain's Merseyside radio and a former member of a Cavern Club band himself, was one of the lucky few. "It was tremendous. I mean, he just did a rock 'n' roll set, really. It was kind of his stuff, but obviously his own roots."

The band played songs by Buddy Holly, Elvis Presley, and Eddie Cochran, but only one Beatles track: "I Saw Her Standing There." "It raised the roof completely, just the one track," Conner gushes. "And that was — to me, it was just tremendous."

McCartney's association with his hometown has lasted through his fame; he's still got family living on Merseyside, including his brother, Michael. "He's back here a lot more than people realize," Conner says.

Some say the visit was simply to promote his latest album, Run Devil Run, but Conner believes the trip was more humble. "I think — he lost Linda, of course, a while ago, as you know. And I think he's got back to his roots and realized times are going on, the years are going by, and he wanted to rock 'n' roll again. And where better to begin than Liverpool?"