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U.S., India Announce Defense, Nuclear Deals

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U.S., India Announce Defense, Nuclear Deals

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U.S., India Announce Defense, Nuclear Deals

U.S., India Announce Defense, Nuclear Deals

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The U.S. and India agreed Monday on a defense pact as well as two sites for U.S. firms to build nuclear power plants. The agreements were announced by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her Indian counterpart, S.M. Krishna.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

And I'm Madeleine Brand.

Hillary Clinton calls it U.S.- India 3.0. The secretary of state has been on a trip to India trying to promote the latest version of relations between the two countries. Today, it's Secretary Clinton's last full day in India. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports on some of the deals that have come out of her trip.

MICHELE KELEMEN: After a long day of zipping around New Delhi to meet government officials, opposition figures and students, Secretary Clinton said the countries are talking to each other in new ways. And she announced a few agreements that could be a boon for U.S. companies. One is an end use monitoring agreement meant to ensure that advanced weapons sales sold to India will be used for their intended purpose and won't leak to third countries. Clinton said there's also movement on civil-nuclear power cooperation.

Secretary HILLARY CLINTON (Department of State): Prime Minister Singh told me that sites for two nuclear parks for U.S. companies have been approved by the government. These parks will advance the aims of the U.S.-India civil-nuclear agreement, facilitate billions of dollars in U.S. reactors exports and create jobs in both countries, as well as generate much needed energy for the Indian people.

KELEMEN: India still needs to approve liability legislation that would allow U.S. companies to do business here. A U.S. official said that the Indians expect to get through parliament soon, though the issue has been controversial. When they spoke to reporters tonight, both Clinton and her Indian counterpart S.M. Krishna, glossed over their differences on other major topics ranging from climate change to Iran and non-proliferation. Krishna said only that there dialogue covered all of these issues.

Mr. S.M. KRISHNA (Minister of External Affairs, India): India and the Untied States of America regard each other as global partners. Our two democracies can play a leading and constructive role on the global level in addressing the urgent global challenges of our times.

KELEMEN: Secretary Clinton said she'll be making U.S.-Indian relations a personal priority.

Sec. CLINTON: Now, each of our countries, as you would expect, have different perspectives about the problems we face and how we will solve them. But, as the oldest democracy and the largest democracy in the world, we believe we can work through these differences in our perspectives and focus on shared objectives and concrete results.

KELEMEN: She said India's prime minister would come to Washington in November, in what will be the first state visit that President Obama will host.

Michele Kelemen, NPR News, New Delhi.

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