A Mass Grave In Afghanistan Raises Questions

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dashtremains i

This is the only picture of the Dasht-e-Leili mass grave cleared by the United Nations and Physicians for Human Rights. Typically, PHR does not publish autopsy photos. hide caption

itoggle caption
dashtremains

This is the only picture of the Dasht-e-Leili mass grave cleared by the United Nations and Physicians for Human Rights. Typically, PHR does not publish autopsy photos.

leaningraymond i

Nathaniel Raymond (L) has been leading the investigation into the alleged 2001 Dasht-e-Leili massacre in Afghanistan. Dr. Jennifer Leaning (R) discovered the mass grave of Taliban prisoners. Both work with the organization Physicians for Human Rights. Ben Greenberg hide caption

itoggle caption Ben Greenberg
leaningraymond

Nathaniel Raymond (L) has been leading the investigation into the alleged 2001 Dasht-e-Leili massacre in Afghanistan. Dr. Jennifer Leaning (R) discovered the mass grave of Taliban prisoners. Both work with the organization Physicians for Human Rights.

Ben Greenberg

In 2001, shortly after the American invasion of Afghanistan, hundreds or possibly thousands of Taliban and Al Qaeda prisoners surrendered to Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum, an Afghan warlord on the payroll of the C.I.A.

Over the course of three days, the captured prisoners were allegedly packed into shipping containers without food or water. Many suffocated, while others were reportedly shot by guards.

The mass grave has never been fully exhumed, and human rights groups allege that the Bush administration discouraged investigation of the matter, even after the urging of officials from the F.B.I., the State Department and the Red Cross.

Dr. Jennifer Leaning, Nathaniel Raymond and Dr. Nizam Peerwani of Physicians for Human Rights discuss their investigation of the alleged massacre and how the Obama administration is dealing with the issue.

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