NPR logo

Australian Spies Giant Hole On Jupiter's South Pole

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106913242/106913263" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Australian Spies Giant Hole On Jupiter's South Pole

Science

Australian Spies Giant Hole On Jupiter's South Pole

Australian Spies Giant Hole On Jupiter's South Pole

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106913242/106913263" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An amateur astronomer in Australia saw something remarkable the other night: a hole the size of the Pacific Ocean near Jupiter's south pole.

Anthony Wesley wasn't expecting much as he was looking at Jupiter; the weather predictions weren't great for observation. He had just about decided to call it quits, when he decided to go just a little bit longer — and saw a big spot on the planet.

He first thought it was a shadow cast by one of Jupiter's moons. It turns out he was the first person to see what is likely a massive comet strike.

Linda Wertheimer talks with Wesley, of Murrumbateman in New South Wales, Australia.