Timeline: The Six Day War

A war in 1967 between Israel and its Arab neighbors reshaped the modern Middle East. Here's a look at key events during the six days of fighting.

June 5

Israeli air attacks against Egypt begin in the morning.

Israel later begins air strikes in Jordan and targets Syria air force bases.

Syria, Jordan and Iraq begin air strikes on Haifa.

Jordan launches air strikes on Netanya and other Israeli targets.

Jordan and Iraq attempt airstrikes against Tel Aviv. Jordan also begins artillery fire against the city.

June 6

Syrian forces fortify the border with Israel and begin artillery fire.

Israel takes Gaza, Ras el Naqeb and Jebel Libni from Egypt.

Ramallah, North East Jerusalem, Ammunition Hill and Talpiot are among areas Israeli forces capture.

Jordanian forces are ordered to retreat from West Bank.

June 7

U.N. Security Council presents a cease-fire initiative. Egypt's President Gamal Abdel Nasser turns it down. Israeli Prime Minister Levi Eskol proposes to Jordan's King Hussein that a cease-fire and peace talks begin. Hussein doesn't respond.

Bir al-Hasna and Al Qazima in Egypt are claimed by Israel.

Old City of Jerusalem, Nablus and Jericho are among those places that fall in Jordan.

Jordanian forces are ordered to retreat.

Fighting between Syria and Israel continues on the border of Golan.

June 8

Egypt accepts a cease-fire.

Hebron falls to the Israeli army.

Fighting continues on the border of Golan.

June 9

An attack on Golan Heights is ordered.

June 10

Israel takes Kuneitra and Mas'ada.

Cease-fire with Syria is agreed upon.

War ends, with Israel claiming the Gaza Strip, West Bank, Golan Heights and Sinai Peninsula to the Suez Canal.

Sources: The Israel Project, Michael Oren speech to the Middle East Forum (May 2002), Zionism and Israel Information Center, Palestine Facts

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