ATC Audio Engineer Bill Deputy Leaves NPR

All Things Considered audio engineer Bill Deputy is leaving Thursday after 18 years on the job. Over the years, listeners have come to appreciate the way NPR sounds. That emphasis on good sound means we need the best ears in the business; two of those ears belong to Deputy.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

We're saying goodbye to a colleague today. Over the years, listeners have come to appreciate the way NPR sounds, whether or not they agree with what's being said. And that emphasis on good sound means that we need the best ears in the business.

Well, two of those ears belong to our audio engineer, Bill Deputy. You never hear Bill on the air, but you do hear the standard that he's insisted on. Whether he's recording the vanishing sounds of steam trains, cops on the beat in Baltimore or any number of musicians through the years, Bill's appreciation for the subtleties of sound has enriched this program.

(Soundbite of train)

Unidentified People: (Singing) (unintelligible)

Unidentified Man: Did you hit her?

Unidentified Woman: (unintelligible)

Unidentified Man: Did you hit her?

Unidentified Woman: (unintelligible)

(Soundbite of music)

SIEGEL: Recordings by Bill Deputy, who leaves today after 18 years at NPR. In his new endeavors, we hope that Bill will be out there listening. Thanks, Bill, and good luck.

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