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Iran Warns Detractors of Nuclear Program

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Iran Warns Detractors of Nuclear Program

Middle East

Iran Warns Detractors of Nuclear Program

Iran Warns Detractors of Nuclear Program

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The President of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, warned the U.S. and its allies to abandon what he called "arrogant policies." Ahmadinejad also seemed to dismiss any idea that his country would use its nuclear activities to build weapons. That is exactly what the United Nations and others fear most. But Tuesday Ahmadinejad asked the rhetorical question, "What is an atomic bomb good for?" He went on to say, "Thoughts can't be changed by a nuclear bomb. Today is the day of thought and logic."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Across Iraq's border, the president of Iran is warning off those opposed to his nation's nuclear program. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad says today that it is too late to stop Iran. And he warned the U.S. and its allies to abandon what he called arrogant policies. At the same time, Ahmadinejad seemed to dismiss any idea that his country would use its nuclear activities to build weapons. That is exactly what the United Nations and others fear most.

But today Ahmadinejad asked the rhetorical question, what is an atomic bomb good for? He went on to say thoughts can't be changed by a nuclear bomb and today, he said, is the day of thought and logic.

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