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Move It to the End of the Line

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Move It to the End of the Line

Move It to the End of the Line

Move It to the End of the Line

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10884219/10884236" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the on-air puzzle this week, Will reads some sentences. Each sentence has two blanks. Think of a five-letter word that goes in the first blank, move its first letter to the end to get a new five-letter word that can go in the second blank to complete the sentence.

Example: Because of her interest in hearing, _______ Bush may once have considered a career as a certified ______ therapist. The answer would be Laura and Aural.

Challenge from Last Week: A two-part challenge, and either half will work. Take the name Isaac, those letters are the initials of a classic song. Name the song. (Hint: The "I" does not stand for the pronoun and neither "A" is the article.) So think of a famous song that represents an "accidental acrostic" of Isaac — or think of any other legitimate "accidental acrostic" of five or more letters.

Answer: Ida, Sweet as Apple Cider

Winner: Dr. George Davis from Cherry Hill, N.J.

Next Week's Challenge: From Gary Alvstad of Tustin, Calif. Think of a well-known U.S. city; the letters in its name can be rearranged into a symbol for 1,000, a symbol for 10, and two words meaning zero. What city is it?