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Kellogg's Rethinks Ads for Sugary Cereals

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Kellogg's Rethinks Ads for Sugary Cereals

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Kellogg's Rethinks Ads for Sugary Cereals

Kellogg's Rethinks Ads for Sugary Cereals

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The world's largest cereal maker plans to stop marketing sugary cereals to children under 12. Advocacy groups and parents threatened to sue Kellogg's for advertising junk food to kids. The groups agreed to halt the suit if Kellogg's would drop such ads.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our business news starts with a bid against Pop-Tarts from the company that makes them. This morning the world's largest cereal maker unveiled the plan to phase out advertising unhealthy food to kids. Kellogg Company plans to stop marketing cereals like Froot Loops and Apple Jacks to children under 12 unless those products can meet new nutritional guidelines. The changes come after advocacy groups and parents threatened to sue Kellogg for marketing junk food to kids. The groups have now agreed not to proceed with the lawsuit. Kellogg says half of the products it markets to kids don't make the nutritional cut.

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