Coltrane Motion: 'Twenty-Seven' Coltrane Motion is a Midwestern band with as much love for the Ronettes as they have for My Bloody Valentine. They have created what they call a "Phil Spector Shoegaze laptop record" out of drum breaks, drones and broken synthesizers.
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Coltrane Motion: 'Twenty-Seven'

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Coltrane Motion: 'Twenty-Seven'

Coltrane Motion: 'Twenty-Seven'

Coltrane Motion: 'Twenty-Seven'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11068043/11068992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

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Coltrane Motion

"Yeh, let's make a Phil Spector Shoegaze laptop record out of drum breaks, drone and broken synthesizers," reads Coltrane Motion's Myspace page describing their new album Songs About Music . Coltrane Motion, also known as Michael Bond and Matt Dennewitz, is a Midwestern band with as much love for the Ronettes as they have for My Bloody Valentine.

Songs About Music, as the title implies, may be an excuse to unabashedly cop licks and lyrics, but distinguishing these musical instances isn't easy. Their idea of Spector's famous "Wall of Sound" technique is more like a 200 ft. electric fence, drowning melodies in distortion and noise.

Live, Bond and Dennewitz tinker with homemade electronics, self-written software, and a mess of synthesizers. Concerts have been described as "an exuberant seizure" and "the cool kids from programming class." This is not Florian Schneider's idea of laptop performance.

"Yeh, let's call it rock n roll," says Bond.