Local Food Co-Ops Go Beyond Greens

Kate Stillman and Aidan Davin at their farm i i

Aidan Davin and Kate Stillman run a farm a couple of hours from Boston. This year they have sold more than twice as many shares in their meat farm as last year. Chris Arnold, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Chris Arnold, NPR
Kate Stillman and Aidan Davin at their farm

Aidan Davin and Kate Stillman run a farm a couple of hours from Boston. This year they have sold more than twice as many shares in their meat farm as last year.

Chris Arnold, NPR
Sheep from Stillman Farm, two hours outside of Boston i i

Members of the meat co-op receive monthly allotments of locally raised, frozen meat. Chris Arnold, NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Chris Arnold, NPR
Sheep from Stillman Farm, two hours outside of Boston

Members of the meat co-op receive monthly allotments of locally raised, frozen meat.

Chris Arnold, NPR

Every month, Lara Tavarez receives a 10 to 20 pound bag of assorted frozen meats without setting foot in a grocery store.

Tavarez participates in the meat-lovers version of a fruit and vegetable co-op, buying a share in a local farm and getting a monthly delivery of lamb, beef, pork and chicken — straight from the farmer that raised them. The farm is just a couple of hours outside of Boston.

While she certainly could find cheaper meat at a supermarket, Tavarez says the taste and peace of mind are worth it.

"The idea that you know the farmer and you know where your meat comes from is profoundly reassuring on so many levels — in terms of health and how the animals were treated, and from an ethical perspective, and from an environmental perspective," she says.

And Tavarez is not alone.

Kate Stillman and her husband Aidan Davin run the farm that Tavarez joined. They say that keeping up with demand is a struggle. This year, they have sold more than twice as many farm shares as last year.

"The response has been unbelievable," Stillman says. "I mean, people are really enthusiastic. The e-mails are really hysterical. I've had people tell me we make their lives better — which, you know, it makes you smile, makes you feel good."

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