The Watergate: 35 Years of Notoriety The Watergate Complex was considered the height of urban luxury when it opened 40 years ago. But it gained notoriety when political operatives broke into the Democratic National Committee's offices in the building in 1972. June 17 marks the 35th anniversary of the infamous break-in.
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The Watergate: 35 Years of Notoriety

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The Watergate: 35 Years of Notoriety

The Watergate: 35 Years of Notoriety

The Watergate: 35 Years of Notoriety

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The Watergate complex in Washington, D.C., is shown in June 2002. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

The Watergate complex in Washington, D.C., is shown in June 2002.

Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

When it opened in 1967, the Watergate Complex was considered the height of urban luxury. Then, it became notorious when, on June 17, 1972, a bunch of inept political operatives broke into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee, which had a suite in the Watergate office tower.

The trial that followed eventually spurred President Richard Nixon's resignation. "Watergate" became both a household name and a suffix (for example, "Travel-gate"). June 17 marks the 35th anniversary of the infamous break-in.