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Drinks After Hemingway's Own Heart

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Drinks After Hemingway's Own Heart

Food

Drinks After Hemingway's Own Heart

Drinks After Hemingway's Own Heart

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/111023962/111023937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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American author Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) and his wife, journalist Martha Gellhorn (1908 - 1998), stand on deck aboard a ship, wearing multiple leis and holding cocktails. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

American author Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961) and his wife, journalist Martha Gellhorn (1908 - 1998), stand on deck aboard a ship, wearing multiple leis and holding cocktails.

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

If Hemingway were throwing a celebration for his 110th birthday, it's a sure bet that the festivities would include a hefty dose of spirits.

Phil Greene, of the Museum of the American Cocktail, meets us at a watering hole in downtown Washington, D.C., to tell us about the drinks Hemingway wrote about, especially a unique version of a frozen daiquiri. Fittingly enough, the drink is both strong and tart.