The Global Burger: A Leading Economic Indicator The Economist's Big Mac Index compares the price of a Big Mac in dozens of countries, using the hamburger to draw conclusions about the strength of each country's currency. In a recession in which no one relishes a strong currency, China's Big Mac remains unsustainably cheap, and at $6, Switzerland's is wildly overpriced.
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The Global Burger: A Leading Economic Indicator

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The Global Burger: A Leading Economic Indicator

The Global Burger: A Leading Economic Indicator

The Global Burger: A Leading Economic Indicator

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The Economist's Big Mac Index compares the price of a Big Mac in dozens of countries, using the hamburger to draw conclusions about the strength of each country's currency.

In a recession in which no one relishes a strong currency, China's Big Mac remains unsustainably cheap, and at $6, Switzerland's is wildly overpriced — unless they're dressing the burger with cornichons.

Guy Raz discusses the latest results with All Things Considered producer Zoe Chace.

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