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Spam at 70: Still Well Preserved

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Spam at 70: Still Well Preserved

Spam at 70: Still Well Preserved

Spam at 70: Still Well Preserved

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11103533/11103535" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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As the potted meat product marks its 70th anniversary, it's still a popular option. In Hawaii, Spam is the new front in a fast-food breakfast war. Burger King in Hawaii now features signs that say "Spam in the A.M."

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And our last word in business today is a different kind of Spam. Not the e-mailed stock offers but the meat.

(Soundbite of ad)

GROUP: (Singing) Spam for you and spam for me, and we're all this together in spam harmony, that's spam.com.

INSKEEP: This year marks the 70th anniversary of those pork bricks and Spam has proved it can change with the times. It is now available in low sodium and light versions. Spam is said to be so popular in Hawaii that it has become the new front in the huge war between Burger King and McDonalds.

Burger King just added spam to its breakfast menu, trying to edge in on McDonald's popular $3.39 Spam, eggs and rice.

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