NPR logo

David Edelstein on 'Fido'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11114376/11114377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
David Edelstein on 'Fido'

David Edelstein on 'Fido'

David Edelstein on 'Fido'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11114376/11114377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The zombie comedy Fido offers satire along with splatter; Fresh Air's film critic says it's "the blood wedding of George Romero and SCTV, and it's a treat for those who don't mind gnawed-off limbs with their hijinks." It's set in a '50s-flavored, Fiestaware-colored retro society, which can be a bit tiresome, because the decade's father-knows-best archetypes have been picked clean. Still, Edelstein says, "director and co-writer Andrew Currie treats his characters with so much affection that even the stereotypes have a fresh life."