Farm Fresh Foods

Farm Food Interactive

This Morning Edition series takes you to America's farmers markets and roadside stands for a sample of what's growing on its farms, in its gardens and across the countryside. We invite you to share your recipes and ideas.

Click on the photos for stories, tips and recipes. Use the side arrows to see more.

[Interactive:Farm Food Interactive]

This graphic requires version 9 or higher of the Adobe Flash Player.Get the latest Flash Player.

This interactive content is not supported by this device.

[Interactive: Farm Fresh Foods]

 

Market Pastries: Baking The Taste Of France

Baker Bertrand Houlier with the sweet treats and breads he sells at the Montgomery Farm Women's Cooperative Market in Bethesda, Md. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

Audio Report, Quick Facts and Recipes
itoggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Customers line up early at Bertrand Houlier's stand at the Montgomery Farm Women's Cooperative Market in Bethesda, Md. They're there for Houlier's French pastries — all kinds of sweet treats and breads. His specialty is the croissant.

Daikon: Unearthing The Radish With Soul

You may have noticed a vegetable at your local farmers market that looks kind of like an albino carrot on steroids. It's a daikon radish. Kazu Yoshimoto, who runs a daikon farm in Massachusetts, says that unlike regular radishes, daikon has kick.

Tina Antolini reports from member station from WFCR in Amherst, Mass.

Urban Blackberry Pickers Score Big In Seattle

This is the time of year when Seattleites go foraging for their food. You see them in parks and along roadsides picking blackberries off the bushes that run rampant throughout the city. The state considers the bushes a "Class C noxious weed."

Flavored Snacks From Pedrick's Keep A Family Happy

Some of the many varieties of pistachios available at Pedrick Produce in Dixon, Calif. Larry Abramson/NPR hide caption

Audio Report and Recipe
itoggle caption Larry Abramson/NPR

Fresh fruits and vegetables may lure us to roadside stands, but it's hard to leave without stocking up on the weird regional snacks you can also find there. And if you're headed up to California's Sierra mountains, the best place to get your fix is at Pedrick Produce.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

All summer we've been chronicling the delights offered by local produce stands from fiddleheads to peaches to pluots - that's a combo of plum and apricot. It's fresh fruits and vegetables that lure us to roadside markets, but let's be honest: it's hard to leave without stocking up on a few weird snacks as well.

NPR's Larry Abramson gets his fix at Pedrick's Produce in Dixon, California.

(Soundbite of clanging)

LARRY ABRAMSON: Pedrick's location is not scenic. This barn of a produce stand lies hard by Interstate 80. It is surrounded by the mega-farms of the Sacramento Valley. But it's an easy stop on the way to the cabin my in-laws share in the California Sierra. We stock up at Pedrick's - fruit, vegetables and flavored pistachios.

Mr. HENRY BARRAZA (Owner, Pedrick Produce): The Cajun, the jalapeno, the onion-garlic, the barbecue, the garlic, hickory smoke, chili con (unintelligible) -they're all flavored.

ABRAMSON: Henry Barraza, Pedrick's owner, has a big smiling face with a head of thick, gray hair. This is the man who has fed my family's snack habit for decades. Out biggest sin: pineapple-honey or coffee-flavored almonds. Every year as vacation ended, the supply would dwindle and my wife would try to ration these delicacies but they often disappeared during midnight raids.

I can't imagine the temptation that Pedrick's workers, like Angelica Grigsby, face every day.

Ms. ANGELICA GRIGSBY (Employee, Pedrick Produce): The butter toffee chocolate almonds - chocolate, toffee and nuts - is all good.

ABRAMSON: Are they your downfall?

Ms. GRIGSBY: Yeah, it's always good.

ABRAMSON: Grigsby is only 20 but she's already been at Pedrick's for five years, thanks to good connections to management.

Ms. GRIGSBY: Henry's my godfather, and…

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. GRIGSBY: …yeah, no, he is. He's good to work for. He's fair.

ABRAMSON: Those connections contribute to the family feeling here. But at bottom, Pedrick's is still a business.

Mr. BARRAZA: (Unintelligible) stacked in the corner to make it look pretty.

ABRAMSON: Making it pretty.

Jose Jimenez has spent half of his 34 years at Pedrick. He's stacking a mountain of corn with a casual precision that leaves it looking like an intricate jigsaw puzzle. The price: four for a dollar. Henry Barraza says he has to keep the price low to compete with other stands.

Mr. BARRAZA: We're not making anything on those ears of corn, but you can go out and for a dollar, you can feed a family of four. You know, that'll be one of the items you could put on your plate and where else could you do that?

ABRAMSON: Those corn customers might grab a bag of something that's more profitable, like those flavored nuts. And you never know when that purchase will turn an accidental visitor into a lifetime customer.

Larry Abramson, NPR News.

WERTHEIMER: You can explore our other farm-fresh foods at the new NPR.org. You'll also find recipes in our Kitchen Window series.

(Soundbite of music)

WERTHEIMER: It's NPR News.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.