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MillerCoors Tests Market For Draft-Beer Box

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MillerCoors Tests Market For Draft-Beer Box

Business

MillerCoors Tests Market For Draft-Beer Box

MillerCoors Tests Market For Draft-Beer Box

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/111359281/111359264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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U.S. brewer MillerCoors is testing sales of what it calls "Home Draft." It's a 1.5-gallon box of Miller Lite or Coors Light that fits into the refrigerator. The beer stays fresh in the box for 30 days. The Wall Street Journal reports the box sells for $20.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Tonight's gathering comes as beer sales - including those of Bud Lite, by the way - lose their fizz. Beer makers are coming up with all kinds of new packaging to entice beer drinkers back. And our last word in business today is beer in a box. MillerCoors, the second largest U.S. brewer, is test marketing what it calls Home Draft. It is a one-and-a-half gallon box of beer - sort of like a box of coffee - designed to fit inside refrigerators. It's aimed at beer drinkers who prefer draft beers. And we're told you do not have to guzzle the whole box right after buying it because the beer allegedly stays fresh for 30 days. This might even appeal to environmentalists; the Wall Street Journal says the box is recyclable.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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