Mixing Up Some Famous Names In the on-air puzzle this week, every answer is the name of a famous person whose first name starts with "J".
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Mixing Up Some Famous Names

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Mixing Up Some Famous Names

Mixing Up Some Famous Names

Mixing Up Some Famous Names

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11136392/11136408" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In the on-air puzzle this week, every answer is the name of a famous person whose first name starts with "J." Will Shortz provides the first name and an anagram of the last name. You identify the person.

Example: Janet "Oner" would be Janet Reno.

Challenge from Last Week: From Gary Alvstad of Tustin, California: Think of a well-known U.S. city; the letters in its name can be rearranged into a symbol for 1,000, a symbol for 10, and two words meaning zero. What city is it?

Answer: Knoxville. K is a symbol for 1,000; X is the Roman numeral for 10; love and nil mean zero.

Winner: Christopher Reese of Lexington, Kentucky.

This Week's Challenge: Take a familiar three-word title, with four letters in the first word, two letters in the next and six letters in the last. The last word contains the consecutive letters R-A-N. Change the R-A-N, to O-R and you'll get another familiar three-word phrase. What is it?