Pope To Be Featured On New CD

Geffen Records says Pope Benedict will appear on the CD Alma Mater. He'll sing prayers and speak litanies in Italian, Portuguese, French and German. Some proceeds from the CD will be used to fund musical education for underprivileged children around the world.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Our last word in business today is holy harmony. A major record label, one who's lineup includes Guns N' Roses and Snoop Dogg, has signed a celebrity to produce a Christmas CD that could appeal to a billion people. Geffen Records has signed the pope. Pope Benedict XVI is working on a CD to be called "Alma Mater." He'll sing prayers and speak litanies in Italian, Portuguese, French and German. The CD will also include modern classical music and new compositions. The label says the pontiff has an incredible voice. Some proceeds from the CD will be used to fund musical education for underprivileged children around the world.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

I was hoping, Linda, you'd tell me there would be some papal rap in their someplace, but maybe that will be the next CD. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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