Diversions

China Uses Fifth-Grade Students To Stop Cheaters

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Cheating on tests for civil service jobs apparently is commonplace in China. Even test monitors sometimes overlook it. One district tried a new way to stop the cheating. At police department exams, a team of fifth-grade students were walking the aisles. They showed no mercy. At one site, more than one-third of the test-takers were disqualified.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. In China, cheating on tests for civil service jobs is apparently commonplace. Even test monitors sometimes overlook it. One district tried a new way to stop the cheating. At police department exams, a team of fifth graders were walking the aisles. And they showed no mercy. At one exam of 66 officers, they disqualified more than a third of the test takers.

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