GE, Pearson May Put In Bid to Buy Dow Jones

General Electric, which owns broadcasting giant NBC, and Pearson PLC, the publisher of The Financial Times, are in talks about joining up to make an alternative bid for Dow Jones & Co., which owns The Wall Street Journal. If they make a bid, it would rival Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation's $5-billion offer.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with another possible buyer for Dow Jones.

How about General Electric? Since Rupert Murdoch and his NewsCorp made a $5 billion bid for the company that owns the Wall Street Journal, he has not faced many serious rivals.

But over the weekend reports emerged of another alternative bid. General Electric would be involved. It owns NBC, and also owns CNBC, a cable news channel that Rupert Murdoch wants to challenge. So that may be part of this. Now, General Electric would team up with another big company, Pearson PLC, the publisher of the Financial Times. And they're in talks about joining up to make this alternative bid.

If it happened, it would create a financial news powerhouse and might also please those at the Wall Street Journal who do not believe that Rupert Murdoch would leave them alone.

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