Doctor: Gamers Get Tendonitis from Wii Mania

In this month's issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Julio Bonis, diagnoses himself with a new kind of acute tendonitis. The cause of the injury was playing hours of tennis — on his Nintendo Wii console. His recommended treatment is ibuprofen for a week, and complete abstinence from Wii video games.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And let's just add a little warning label for those spending a lot of time online. If you buy a lot of clothes in Second Life, you could end up addicted to virtual shopping. And if you play a lot of video games, you could find yourself suffering from a real-world ailment. So our last word in business today is Wii-itis.

In this month's issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Julio Bonis diagnoses himself with a new kind of acute tendonitis. The cause of the injury was playing hours of tennis on his Nintendo Wii console. You actually make the motions with your hands. His recommended treatment is ibuprofen for a week and complete abstinence from Wii video games. Under those conditions the patient recovered fully.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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