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Schulberg Dies 'On The Waterfront' Screenwriter

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Schulberg Dies 'On The Waterfront' Screenwriter

Remembrances

Schulberg Dies 'On The Waterfront' Screenwriter

Schulberg Dies 'On The Waterfront' Screenwriter

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Oscar-winning screenwriter Budd Schulberg has died at his home on Long Island, N.Y. He was 95. Schulberg wrote the script for On the Waterfront, as well as the groundbreaking Hollywood satire What Makes Sammy Run?

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Can't finish our economic coverage without noting a defender of the working man. Screenwriter Budd Schulberg has died at 95. His movie "On the Waterfront" is famous for Marlon Brando's line, I coulda been a contender. But it's just as memorable for Karl Malden, a Catholic priest pushing longshoremen to testify against a corrupt union boss.

(Soundbite of movie, "On the Waterfront")

Mr. KARL MALDEN (Actor): (as Father Barry) You want to hurt Johnny Friendly? Huh? You want to hurt him? You want to fix him? Do you? You really want to finish him?

Mr. MARLON BRANDO (Actor): (as Terry Malloy) What do you think?

Mr. MALDEN: (as Father Barry) For what he did to Charley and a dozen other men who are better than Charley? Then don't fight him like a hoodlum down here in the jungle because that's just what he wants. He'll hit you in the head and plead self-defense. You'll fight him in the courtroom tomorrow with the truth.

INSKEEP: Then in Schulberg's screenplay the priest turns to a bartender and barks, Give me a beer.

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