High School Football: A Game Of Guts And Ritual

At Rye High School in New York, the end-of-game ritual is to jump into a brook. i i

hide captionAt Rye High School in New York, the end-of-game ritual is to jump into a brook. NPR wants to see photos and videos of high school football rituals where you live.

clyatt.jasper via Flickr
At Rye High School in New York, the end-of-game ritual is to jump into a brook.

At Rye High School in New York, the end-of-game ritual is to jump into a brook. NPR wants to see photos and videos of high school football rituals where you live.

clyatt.jasper via Flickr

Tell Us Your Stories

All through the 2009 season, NPR will bring you some of the stories, characters, struggles and victories of high school football. We'd like your help identifying those stories.

What goes on in your city or town? Is there an extraordinary person or team we should talk to? A ritual we should know about?

Click here for instructions — we want to hear from you.

Starting with training camp and all through the 2009 season, NPR will bring you some of the stories, struggles and victories of high school football and the communities who support it, while also exploring the costs and the issues the sport raises.

In big cities and small towns across the country, high school football is the ritual that defines the fall. And for many young men, it is the ritual that defines who they are.

More than a million American boys suit up and take the field every year, playing on more than 14,000 teams. Some have world-class workout facilities and top-notch coaches. Others compete with six on a side and an English teacher drawing up plays.

High school football is a phenomenon that touches virtually every aspect of American life — but it's not all quarterbacks and prom queens. It's big business. In many places, team budgets are growing fast. In some communities, the coaches earn well over $100,000 a year — often more than the principal, and way more than the other teachers.

And football is dangerous. Every year there are deaths from heat and exhaustion, and some 41,000 players suffer concussions. Ronald Reagan, himself a former high school football player, said in 1981, "[Football] is the last thing left in civilization where men can literally fling themselves bodily at one another in combat and not be at war."

For this series, NPR correspondents Tom Goldman and Mike Pesca will report from around the country from sweltering practices in August through the state championships in November. They'll report from communities big and small. They'll cover the games — and also tell stories of the athletes and schools, the families and communities who participate.

You'll find our reports on the radio — All Things Considered will feature stories each Friday afternoon. You'll also find stories online, where you can participate (find the instructions below). So get your cleats laced up and your pom-poms ready — we're about to take the field.

Tell Us Your Stories

Does a member of your family play? What goes on in your city or town? Is there an extraordinary person — or team — we should know about or talk to? Is there an aspect of high school football you'd really like to learn or hear about? Are there aspects of the game that worry you? Use the comments section below to share your stories. Or send us dispatches through Twitter.

We also want to document the people behind the game and the rituals that surround it across the country. What food serves as a game appetizer? What's the special song the players listen to before heading out to the field? Upload your pictures to Flickr or upload videos on YouTube. We'll look through them and post the best on our site.

Share Using Twitter:

Tag your tweets #nprfootball.

Share Using YouTube:

Tag your videos with the keyword nprfootball.

Share Using Flickr:

Step 1: If you're not a member yet, join Flickr. It doesn't cost anything to join, though if you want to use it to share a lot of photos — i.e., hundreds or thousands — you may want to purchase a Pro account.

Step 2: Upload pics you'd like to share with the Friday Night Lives group. (If you're having trouble uploading, consult Flickr's help guide.)

Step 3. Go to the Friday Night Lives group and click "join this group." Confirm your membership.

Step 4: Find a photo from your collection that you'd like to add to the group. Between the title of the photo and the photo itself, you'll see a series of tabs. Click "Send to Group," then select "Friday Night Lives."

And that's it; you're done. Your photo will now be included in the group collection.

Comments

 

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