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Broadband Company Uses Pickpockets To Give Back

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Broadband Company Uses Pickpockets To Give Back

Business

Broadband Company Uses Pickpockets To Give Back

Broadband Company Uses Pickpockets To Give Back

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As part of a promotion by a broadband company, reformed pickpockets have been dispatched to the streets of London. Their mission is to slip British pounds into the pockets and purses of the unsuspecting. TalkTalk launched the initiative to prove that companies can give something back without any strings.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

One broadband company has gone right past free products and services and gone straight to free cash. And that's our last word in business today. It's part of our promotion by a broadband company. Reformed pickpockets have been dispatched to the streets of London. Their mission is to slip up to 20 British pounds. That's about $30 into pockets and purses of the unsuspecting. One reformed purse snatcher said every time I put money back in someone's pocket, I feel less guilty about the fact that I spent many years taking it out.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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