Afghans Choose Their Next President

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    Men walk to vote Thursday in Iskazar, in the Kuran wa Munjan district of Badakhshan province in northern Afghanistan. More than 300 mainly ethnic Tajiks cast their votes in the presidential election in this village in the Hindu Kush mountains.
    David Gilkey/NPR/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Afghan National Police try to control a line of men waiting to vote at the polling center in Iskazar.
    David Gilkey/NPR/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    A boy waits in the back of a truck while his father votes in Iskazar, near the Anjuman River.
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    An Afghan election official tries to figure out how to don his election bib in the polling center before voters arrive in Iskazar.
    David Gilkey/NPR/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Sapnah, 21, had been looking for a women's polling station for 20 minutes with her two small boys in Kandahar. She said her family didn't know that she had come out to vote, but that she was determined to vote for Karzai.
    Holly Pickett for NPR/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Female election officials walk in a deserted hallway at a women's polling center in Kandahar. Fear of Taliban attacks kept many women at home during Afghanistan's presidential and provincial council elections.
    Holly Pickett for NPR/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah shows his finger marked with paint while casting his ballot at a polling station in Kabul.
    Dima Gavrysh/AP/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Afghan President Hamid Karzai voted in a boys' high school near his heavily fortified palace soon after the polls opened. He urged Afghans to go to the polls.
    Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    An Afghan woman casts her vote at a polling station in Kabul.
    Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    An Afghan man casts his ballot at a mosque in Kabul.
    Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    An Afghan National Army soldier votes in Helmand province. Because of a bomb threat, voting was initially open only to civil servants, soldiers and police before the polling center was opened to the general public.
    Julie Jacobson/AP/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Afghans wait for the opening of a polling center in Kabul. The Taliban vowed to disrupt the country's second democratic election.
    Pedro Ugarte/AFP/Getty Images/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    U.S. Marine Sgt. Raymond Shinahra (right) and Navy Corpsman Michael Cannova deliver a box of ballots from election headquarters in Lashkar Gah to officials in Dahaneh in Helmand province. Village officials discovered early in the morning that they didn't have any ballots.
    Julie Jacobson/AP/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Voters are checked before entering a polling center in Herat.
    Saurabh Das/AP/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Afghan police gesture at the scene of a shootout with suspected Taliban suicide bombers in Kabul. According to police, three militants exchanged gunfire with police. Two of the suspects were killed in the gunbattle.
    Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.
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    Afghan women in Kandahar search the ballot for their candidate.
    Musadeq Sadeq/AP/Photos by NPR, AP and Getty Images.

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