In Minnesota, a Drug Store Becomes Town Hall Minnesota residents find an unusual spot to meet Democratic candidates for public office and discuss the issues. Once a month, pharmacist Tom Sengupta turns his drug store into a neighborhood town hall.
NPR logo

In Minnesota, a Drug Store Becomes Town Hall

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11211900/11211901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
In Minnesota, a Drug Store Becomes Town Hall

In Minnesota, a Drug Store Becomes Town Hall

In Minnesota, a Drug Store Becomes Town Hall

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11211900/11211901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tom Sengupta owns Schneider's Drugstore. Elaine May hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine May

Tom Sengupta owns Schneider's Drugstore.

Elaine May

No candidate runs for office as a Democrat in the state of Minnesota without first visiting Schneider's Drug Store.

Once a month, pharmacist Tom Sengupta turns his store into a neighborhood town hall, providing an intimate setting to talk about local and state issues.