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Statics: Baby Boomers Still Getting High
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Statics: Baby Boomers Still Getting High

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Statics: Baby Boomers Still Getting High

Statics: Baby Boomers Still Getting High
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The U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reports baby boomers are still turning to illegal drugs. The rates of people aged 50 to 59 who admit to using illicit drugs in the past year nearly doubled from 5.1 percent in 2002 to 9.4 percent in 2007. Meanwhile rates among all other age groups are the same or decreasing.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The standard history says Baby Boomers had lots of fun in the '60s and '70s. Then they cleaned up, took jobs, and voted for Reagan. That history may not pass a drug test. The government says Boomers - born from 1946 to '64 - still use plenty of drugs. They doubled illicit drug use for people in their 50s. The old slogan was turn on, tune in, drop out. Now it's turn on, tune in "Matlock" and -what was the third one again?

It's MORNING EDITION.

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