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Op-Ed: No More Sex Testing In Sports

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Op-Ed: No More Sex Testing In Sports

Op-Ed: No More Sex Testing In Sports

Op-Ed: No More Sex Testing In Sports

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/112178722/112178718" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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South African sprinter Caster Semenya celebrates her victory. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images

South African sprinter Caster Semenya celebrates her victory.

Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images

South African sprinter Caster Semenya won the women's 800 meter race in Berlin at the World Athletics Championship. Following her victory, questions surfaced about her sex.

18-year-old Semenya has since had to undergo a series of tests to determine her sex.

In a piece in The Nation with Sherry Wolf, sports writer Dave Zirin argues that sex testing is outdated and humiliating, because "gender — that is, how we comport and conceive of ourselves — is a remarkably fluid social construction." Further, Zirin maintains "physical sex is far more ambiguous and fluid than is often imagined or taught." He calls for an end to the practice of sex testing.

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