The Business Of Cleaning Up After Tragedy Linda Wertheimer profiles two women who started their own Seattle company called BioClean. Stacy Haney and Theresa Borst call themselves "specialists in incident clean-up." After a murder, or a suicide, or a death which has gone undiscovered for some time, these women clean up what remains after the medical examiner has gone. They started their business when they learned that it is most often the surviving family's responsibility to clean up after a dead body. Their work is hard, gruesome and often upsetting. But they love their jobs, and believe they are saving families from being traumatized twice.
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The Business Of Cleaning Up After Tragedy

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The Business Of Cleaning Up After Tragedy

The Business Of Cleaning Up After Tragedy

The Business Of Cleaning Up After Tragedy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1123029/123029" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Stacy Haney and Theresa Borst are two Washington state women who call themselves "specialists in incident cleanup." They run a Seattle company called BioClean.

After a murder or a suicide, or a death that's gone undiscovered for some time, the women clean up what remains after the medical examiner has gone.

They started their business when they learned that it's most often the surviving family's responsibility to clean up after a dead body.

Their work is hard, gruesome and often upsetting. But they love their jobs — and they believe they are saving families from being traumatized twice.

Linda Wertheimer has a profile.