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FTC To Ban Most Telemarketing 'Robocalls'

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FTC To Ban Most Telemarketing 'Robocalls'

Business

FTC To Ban Most Telemarketing 'Robocalls'

FTC To Ban Most Telemarketing 'Robocalls'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/112323667/112323628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Government regulators issued a new rules Thursday banning telemarketers from sending out prerecorded phone marketing pitches. As of next Tuesday, robocallers face up to $16,000 in fines, unless they have your written permission do so. There are several exceptions including calls that prorvide airline flight information.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is robocall recall.

Government regulators issued new rules yesterday banning telemarketers from sending out prerecorded phone marketing pitches. As of next Tuesday, robocallers face up to 16,000 dollars in fines, unless they have your written permission to call. If you have not signed up for the Do Not Call registry, a live person can call to ask for your permission to receive robocalls.

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INSKEEP: Now, there are some exceptions to these restrictions. Among those who will still be able to legally send you automated pitches are debt collectors -and of course politicians.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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