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Your Letters: Main Street, Catfish In Pools
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Your Letters: Main Street, Catfish In Pools

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Your Letters: Main Street, Catfish In Pools

Your Letters: Main Street, Catfish In Pools
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Host Scott Simon reads listener letters about Main Street in Chattanooga, Tenn., and algae-eating catfish.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Time now for your letters.

(Soundbite of typing and music)

SIMON: Last week, we began our new series Mapping Main Street with a profile of Main Street in Chattanooga, Tennessee, part of which has become a prostitution strip. The segment drew a deluge of letters, many from residents of Chattanooga.

Lisa Dalton is one. She writes that she was disappointed and surprised by the segment: Mention Main Street to anyone who lives in Chattanooga, and especially the downtown area, and the first thought that will come to their mind is the renovation of old buildings, the new homes going up, the new shops and restaurants, and the new life being brought to the area. I was fully expecting this to be the focus of your story. Instead, you focus on issues that are common to every city, such as prostitution, drug usage, and poverty. You could do stories on these subjects every week in every city. How could you miss the real story of Chattanooga's Main Street?

But Chattanooga resident Bryan Harrett(ph) says: My family and I live just off of Main Street. There is a problem and I see it almost every day. I go to Nashville every Friday, leaving at 5:00 a.m. to attend business school. Perhaps the city will now be motivated to help those of us who feel it is a problem.

Last week we told you about a unique effort in Florida to clean up swimming pools on foreclosed properties. Officials have been deploying a kind of catfish that eats up algae in the water.

Joe Middleton says: There's nothing natural about this. He writes: The release of non-native fish into a habitat where they did not exist previously causes all sorts of issues. A pool may sound like a captive environment but as pools have drains and overflows, the fish can be released into local waterways very quickly. Instead of letting the pools go scummy green and create health hazards by allowing mosquitoes to breathe there, why not simply empty them?

Finally, many listeners enjoyed our discussion about humor and religion last week. Niledine Misorbi(ph) of Moscow, in Russia -that Moscow - writes: As a Mormon bishop, I was delighted with Scott's interview with Father James Martin. I'm always amazed when people think Jesus has no sense of humor. From the gentle irony of the Beatitudes - blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the Earth - to its riotous ridicule of smug hypocrisy -let me remove the mote of dust from your eye and, look, there's a log stuck in yours. The Sermon on the Mount is so peppered with Jewish humor that it seems at times almost like an ancient standup routine. There can be no question that Jesus made his listeners laugh.

Well, we'd love to hear from you. You can leave a comment on the new npr.org, or you can reach us on Twitter. I'm nprscottsimon, all one word. You can reach our staff at nprweekend, all one word.

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