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Music Companies Trying a Greener Approach

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Music Companies Trying a Greener Approach

Environment

Music Companies Trying a Greener Approach

Music Companies Trying a Greener Approach

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Despite a drop in CD sales, the music industry is making its mark on the environment — landfills commonly have many CDs and MP3 players, which contain toxic metals and chemicals. One problem: music fans with digital copies of songs often use blank CDs to record their music.

Now some in the music industry are trying to limit the damage. Two independent music labels have shifted to all-digital advance copies. Others have done away with plastic jewel cases in favor of recyclable paperboard CD cases.

And Earthology Recordings, which is based on a geothermal and wind-powered farm. The company prints its recycled CD cases with soy ink.

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