Young People Living, And Laughing, With Cancer

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/112563650/112640188" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript
Iva Skoch i

Iva Skoch was 29 when she was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer. NPR hide caption

itoggle caption NPR
Iva Skoch

Iva Skoch was 29 when she was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer.

NPR
Kairol Rosenthal i

Kairol Rosenthal was diagnosed with thyroid cancer at the age of 27. Courtesy of Kairol Rosenthal hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Kairol Rosenthal
Kairol Rosenthal

Kairol Rosenthal was diagnosed with thyroid cancer at the age of 27.

Courtesy of Kairol Rosenthal

Can cancer be funny? Some patients think so; hundreds of popular blogs — many of which are written by cancer patients younger than 40 — combine realistic cancer confessions with a healthy dose of humor.

Iva Skoch and Kairol Rosenthal, two writers who were diagnosed with cancer in their late 20s, are among the advocates of a laughter-filled approach to the disease. They discuss the concept of "cancertainment" and suggest ways that young adults undergoing cancer treatment can take a different approach to the disease than older generations.

Skoch is the author of the recent Newsweek.com article "Young Patients Laugh at Cancer" and Rosenthal is the author of Everything Changes: The Insider's Guide to Cancer in Your 20s and 30s.

Books Featured In This Story

Everything Changes

The Insider's Guide to Cancer in Your 20s and 30s

by Kairol Rosenthal

Paperback, 247 pages | purchase

Purchase Featured Book

Title
Everything Changes
Subtitle
The Insider's Guide to Cancer in Your 20s and 30s
Author
Kairol Rosenthal

Your purchase helps support NPR Programming. How?

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.