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Letters: Obama's Speech, KitchenAid, Recordings

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Letters: Obama's Speech, KitchenAid, Recordings

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Letters: Obama's Speech, KitchenAid, Recordings

Letters: Obama's Speech, KitchenAid, Recordings

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Melissa Block and Noah Adams read from criticism of the coverage of President Obama's address to students, and letters of praise for stories about KitchenAid blenders and home audio recordings.

NOAH ADAMS, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Noah Adams.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Now to your letters, and much of what we found in our inbox this morning was criticism of our coverage about the controversy surrounding President Obama's speech to students.

ADAMS: In discussing why some school systems had decided not to broadcast the address, several of our listeners felt we did not hear from enough parents and teachers who approved of the president's speech. Jack Larkin of Warren, Massachusetts, writes, I think that in the interest of accuracy, you need to specify, to the extent that you can determine it, how many school districts have made this decision and in what parts of the country they are situated. Are these responses primarily from deep-red states where one would expect resistance to anything that Obama does or says? What does this response mean as an indicator of the nation's political mood? If you inflate every hostile reaction from the right to the level of a nationwide response, you are simply conveying their spin. We rely on NPR for intelligent, accurate, well-researched analysis, not simplistic overstatements.

BLOCK: On yesterday's program we also brought you the story of Phil Nohl and his collection of antique home recordings.

(Soundbite of song, "If I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again")

Unidentified Man: (Singing) How sweet and happy seem those days in which I…

BLOCK: That story about preserving archive audio resonated with several of our listeners, especially Bridget Poissoner(ph) of San Diego who wrote to tell us she's working on a similar project. She writes, I loved that you brought to our attention Phil Nohl's fascination with home-audio recordings. These samples from Mr. Nohl show how these sounds from the past still echo into the present.

As a personal-video biographer, I go to people's homes to conduct video interviews where people share the moments of their lives, so their families will have these for generations to come. I'd like to think that 60 years from now, these will still be viewed and enjoyed.

ADAMS: And finally, my story about the KitchenAid mixer and its all-American roots had many of you reminiscing and commemorating your own version of the mixer. Felice Sussman of Los Alamitos, California, writes: I loved your story about KitchenAid mixers and blenders. I had no idea that these products were still made in the United States. Perhaps that explains why my KitchenAid blender is my very favorite kitchen appliance. It's sturdy, strong, dependable, and as I think my entire family would agree, it makes the world's best pina coladas.

BLOCK: Blender success stories or your criticisms, please keep writing to us. You can visit npr.org and click Contact Us at the bottom of the page.

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