NPR logo

Kansas Water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1127720/127720" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Kansas Water

Kansas Water

Kansas Water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1127720/127720" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Much of America's heartland sits atop a vast underground lake known as the High Plains Aquifer. Stretching as far north as Wyoming and South Dakota, and as far south as Texas, both cities and farms use the aquifer as their primary source of water. But now some officials are worried the aquifer is being over used, and some areas may become depleted if new guidelines aren't established. Peter Hancock from Kansas Public Radio takes a look at the controversy.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.