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After Michael Vick, The Battle To Stop Dogfighting

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After Michael Vick, The Battle To Stop Dogfighting

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After Michael Vick, The Battle To Stop Dogfighting

After Michael Vick, The Battle To Stop Dogfighting

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113158123/113165807" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Animal rights activists turned out at Michael Vick's sentencing hearing to protest the abuse of dogs. Frankie, pictured above, was among them, wearing a sign that says, "Dogfighters use dogs like me for bait!" Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images

Animal rights activists turned out at Michael Vick's sentencing hearing to protest the abuse of dogs. Frankie, pictured above, was among them, wearing a sign that says, "Dogfighters use dogs like me for bait!"

Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images

The hidden world of illegal dogfighting burst into the spotlight with the exposure and eventual conviction of NFL football star Michael Vick, who ran an interstate dogfighting ring on his rural Virginia property.

Vick and three of his associates pleaded guilty in 2007 to charges resulting from their roles in the business. After serving a 23-month prison sentence, Vick has been signed to a new contract by the Philadelphia Eagles, and he has pledged to join the Humane Society's fight against organized animal abuse.

Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies talks with John Goodwin, Humane Society manager of animal-fighting issues, and Sean Moore, a Chicago-based former dogfighter who works in that city on the Humane Society's efforts campaign to end dogfighting in Chicago.