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Global Hawk

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Global Hawk

Global Hawk

Global Hawk

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1131650/131650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Russell Lewis of member station KPBS reports on the new Global Hawk unmanned spy plane. The completely automated Hawk can fly higher and stay up longer than any previous unmanned plane, all while being remotely controlled by a technician with a laptop computer. The planes were originally scheduled to debut in 2003, but they may soon see service in Afghanistan.

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