Federalizing Airport Screeners


Guests:

Dr. Matthew Meselson
* Molecular biologist at Harvard University

James Fallows
* National Correspondent for, Atlantic Monthly
* Author, Free Flight: From Airline Hell to a New Age of Travel (about systemic problems in the airline system)

Senator John Mccain
* Republican Senator from Arizona

Congressman Roy Blunt
* Republican Congressman from Missouri
* House, Deputy Majority Whip

Rafi Ron
* Retired Director of Security for the Israeli Airport Authority — Ben-Gurion airport in Tel Aviv
* Security Consultant for Boston Logan Airport

The Senate unanimously passed an airport security bill that would make nearly 28,000 people who work as passenger and baggage screeners federal workers. Since the September 11th terrorist attack, lawmakers want to beef up airline security, by fortifying cockpit doors and placing armed sky marshals on board planes. But, there's disagreement in Congress on the best way to tighten airport security. Neal Conan talks with members of Congress about the divide over federalizing airport workers.

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