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Ramadan

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Ramadan

Ramadan

Ramadan

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1132938/132938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Musharraf of Pakistan, the indispensable ally in America's war against terrorism, again warned today that U.S. bombing in Afghanistan must stop during the holy month of Ramadan, which begins in about 10 days. The Bush Administration says it has no intention of suspending the air strikes, noting that Muslims have fought each other during Ramadan on many occasions, including the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s. Islamic scholars concede that the Koran allows Muslim soldiers to continue fighting during the holy month, even exempting them from the fasting requirement. But that doesn't mean, the scholars say, that warfare during Ramadan is wise or good. Eric Weiner reports from Islamabad, Pakistan.

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