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Stewart Copeland: A Life Of Misadventure

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Stewart Copeland: A Life Of Misadventure

Stewart Copeland: A Life Of Misadventure

Stewart Copeland: A Life Of Misadventure

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113452658/113485775" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Stewart Copeland's life has been full of adventures, only one of which was drumming for The Police. Danny Clinch hide caption

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Danny Clinch

Stewart Copeland's life has been full of adventures, only one of which was drumming for The Police.

Danny Clinch

Stewart Copeland spent the late '70s and early '80s bashing away on the drum riser behind Sting. The combustible relationship between those two and guitarist Andy Summers fueled The Police's rise to the pinnacle of pop music. That was a wild trip, but for Copeland, it was just one more strange occurrence in a life full of them. Which his why he titled his new memoir Strange Things Happen.

Copeland talks about some of those strange things in an interview with Guy Raz. There was his father, a CIA agent who took his family to Syria for much of young Stewart's formative years. What was his dad's assignment?

"Oh, deposing governments, developing dictators, that sort of thing," Copeland says.

Copeland spent the pre-Police years writing letters to music magazines. In that correspondence, he posed as a reader hailing the drumming prowess of one Stewart Copeland.

He took a crazed trip across Africa as a filmmaker. One scene was particularly interesting: him playing drums in a cage surrounded by lions.

"The movie we ended up with at the end of the day — I'm still scratching my head trying to figure what it's about," he says.

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Copeland says that The Police's reunion tour quickly devolved into traditional warlike behavior — "all hands on throats," as he puts it.

So will The Police ever reunite again?

"I'm getting the cold shakes just thinking about it," Copeland says. "But who knows what's gonna happen?"