Suicide Blast Kills 7 at Iraq's Mansour Hotel

A bomb struck the Mansour Hotel, a high-rise building on the Tigris, killing seven people. The bomb attack was one of five places hit in Iraq, killing a total of at least 30 people. The Mansour is a high-profile target because it is the home of the Chinese embassy, some leading Iraqis, and some foreign reporters.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Here's some news out of Iraq that we're taking note of precisely because it is so ordinary. Bombers struck five different places in Iraq today.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

The high-profile target was the Mansour Hotel, a high-rise on the Tigris. Several people were killed there. And that's the headline story today because the Mansour is home of the Chinese Embassy and of some Western reporters and some leading Iraqis.

INSKEEP: But it was not the only target of attack today. A bomber struck a police station north of Baghdad, killing nine civilians and wounding others. One of the survivors says he was shot by random gunfire after the blast.

MONTAGNE: Not far away, a suicide car bomb hit an Army checkpoint and killed two Iraqis, which was just one of two checkpoints hit today.

INSKEEP: And in the city of Mosul a parked car exploded. At least one person was killed. There was no obvious target nearby, unless the real goal was creating random violence itself.

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