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Hebrew Doesn't Translate for Baseball

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Hebrew Doesn't Translate for Baseball

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Hebrew Doesn't Translate for Baseball

Hebrew Doesn't Translate for Baseball

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Whatever its virtues, Hebrew is not quite ready for baseball. Israel saw its first professional baseball game. And the broadcasters who started calling the game in Hebrew had trouble finding appropriate words for "ball," "strike," or "home plate." They finally slipped into English. Whether the game itself will translate is unknown. But Israel now has a six-team league.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Whatever its virtues, Hebrew is not quite ready for baseball. Israel saw its first professional baseball game, and the broadcasters who started calling the game in Hebrew had trouble finding appropriate words for ball, strike, or home plate. They finally slipped into English. Whether the game itself will translate is unknown, but Israel now has a six-team league. And in game one, the Petah Tikva Pioneers lost to the Modiin Miracles.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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