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U.S. Won't Seek Death Penalty For Ghailani

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U.S. Won't Seek Death Penalty For Ghailani

U.S. Won't Seek Death Penalty For Ghailani

U.S. Won't Seek Death Penalty For Ghailani

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Counterterrorism officials took a careful look at Ahmed Ghailani's case and decided not to seek the death penalty. Ghailani, the first Guantanamo detainee to be brought to a U.S. civilian court for trial, is charged in the 1998 bombing of two U.S. embassies in Africa.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Counterterrorism officials took a careful look at the case of another suspect, and the United States has decided not to seek the death penalty for him. Ahmed Ghailani is in New York. He's charged in the 1998 bombing of two U.S. embassies in Africa. He's the first Guantanamo detainee to be brought to a U.S. civilian court for trial.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Ghailani is alleged to have made bombs, forged documents and conspired with Osama bin Laden to kill Americans. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder wrote a letter directing prosecutors not to seek the death penalty. A Justice Department spokesman says other defendants in the case either received life sentences or were spared the death penalty as a condition of their extradition.

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