Enron Collapse Raises Questions The Justice Department is now conducting a criminal investigation into Enron Corporation, the giant Texas energy trading company that collapsed last year in the biggest corporate bankruptcy in history. Attorney General John Ashcroft has recused himself from the probe, citing his own receipt of $25,000 in corporate contributions from Enron when he was a Senate candidate in 2000. But there were also questions inside the White House itself, where President Bush made a point of separating himself from the company that has been his biggest corporate sponsor. NPR's Don Gonyea reports from the White House.
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Enron Collapse Raises Questions

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Enron Collapse Raises Questions

Enron Collapse Raises Questions

Enron Collapse Raises Questions

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136135/136135" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Justice Department is now conducting a criminal investigation into Enron Corporation, the giant Texas energy trading company that collapsed last year in the biggest corporate bankruptcy in history. Attorney General John Ashcroft has recused himself from the probe, citing his own receipt of $25,000 in corporate contributions from Enron when he was a Senate candidate in 2000. But there were also questions inside the White House itself, where President Bush made a point of separating himself from the company that has been his biggest corporate sponsor. NPR's Don Gonyea reports from the White House.