Occidentalism Robert Siegel is joined by writers Ian Buruma and Avishai Margalit to discuss what they see as a broad historical context for the Sept. 11 suicide hijackings. Margalit is Schulman Professor of Philosophy at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. Buruma is a writer living in London. Together they authored an article called "Occidentalism" in the Jan. 17 issue of The New York Review of Books. The article compares Osama bin Laden's opposition to the West with similar ideas held by the Nazis and Japanese during World War II.
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Occidentalism

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Occidentalism

Occidentalism

Occidentalism

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Robert Siegel is joined by writers Ian Buruma and Avishai Margalit to discuss what they see as a broad historical context for the Sept. 11 suicide hijackings. Margalit is Schulman Professor of Philosophy at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. Buruma is a writer living in London. Together they authored an article called "Occidentalism" in the Jan. 17 issue of The New York Review of Books. The article compares Osama bin Laden's opposition to the West with similar ideas held by the Nazis and Japanese during World War II.