Brandon Patton: Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Brandon Patton spends the bulk of his time playing bass for nerdcore rapper MC Frontalot, but he also writes his own emotional indie rock on the side. A Minnesota native who now calls Staten Island home, Patton wrote his new album Underhill Downs about his time spent living on Underhill Avenue in Brooklyn. After splitting with a girlfriend of eight and a half years, Patton says he spent much of that period walking around in a jilted haze. The songs on Underhill Downs mostly concern the breakup and his subsequent attempts to date again.

Thursday's Pick

  • Song: "Ashes and Stains"
  • Artist: Brandon Patton
  • CD: Underhill Downs
  • Genre: Rock
Brandon Patton i i

In "Ashes and Stains," singer-songwriter Brandon Patton crafts a narrative that's as relatable as it is raw. courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy of the artist
Brandon Patton

In "Ashes and Stains," singer-songwriter Brandon Patton crafts a narrative that's as relatable as it is raw.

courtesy of the artist

The album's weary tone, overdub-heavy production and experimental song structures effectively reflect Patton's emotional headspace at the time. But one of its simplest and most compelling tracks, "Ashes and Stains," paints a vivid picture through more traditional songwriting tools. Its slow-yet-insistent buildup, deceptively jubilant-sounding chorus, key change and soft fade out make for an accessible, immediate tune. Lyrically, of course, it focuses on love lost, with a bit of self-pity thrown in: "I'm walking in the park through the moonlit trees / Thinking of you closing the bar down," Patton sings, adding, "Cut me some slack / I'm still getting my nerve back." By capturing his own self-doubt, Patton crafts a narrative that's as relatable as it is raw.

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Underhill Downs

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Album
Underhill Downs
Artist
Brandon Patton
Released
2009

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