Harlem Since MLK NPR's Juan Williams talks about how Harlem is changing, with two men who have long associations with that traditionally black Manhattan neighborhood: Michael Meyers, who heads the New York Civil Rights Coalition; and Dr. Harold Freeman, a cancer surgeon for 34 years at Harlem's North General Hospital. For much of the 20th century, Harlem was filled with black Americans who had moved there from Georgia, the Carolinas and Mississippi. Now there's more diversity, with many immigrants from Latin America and Africa.
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Harlem Since MLK

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Harlem Since MLK

Harlem Since MLK

Harlem Since MLK

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136684/136684" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Juan Williams talks about how Harlem is changing, with two men who have long associations with that traditionally black Manhattan neighborhood: Michael Meyers, who heads the New York Civil Rights Coalition; and Dr. Harold Freeman, a cancer surgeon for 34 years at Harlem's North General Hospital. For much of the 20th century, Harlem was filled with black Americans who had moved there from Georgia, the Carolinas and Mississippi. Now there's more diversity, with many immigrants from Latin America and Africa.