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'Wittgenstein's Poker': Revisiting an Old Argument

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'Wittgenstein's Poker': Revisiting an Old Argument

'Wittgenstein's Poker': Revisiting an Old Argument

'Wittgenstein's Poker': Revisiting an Old Argument

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136844/136844" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

David Edmonds and John Eidinow have written a 300-page book concerning a heated argument that lasted 10 minutes. At the heart of the story: a heated fireplace implement that was — or was not — raised in anger. The argument was between two Austrian philosophers: Karl Popper and Ludwig Wittgenstein. The two authors tell Robert Siegel that everyone who saw the match-up has a different version of the story.